Sharing Success as an Online Health Blogger

online health blogger

When I started this blog five years ago, I had no idea that it would become what it is today. I had no idea how much it would mean to people, how much it would help them, or how vital it would be for some people. I had no idea that I would become the leading patient resource on blood clots and recovery. I actually had no idea that I would become an online health blogger. Back then, I was just a person, writing about my experience with blood clots, with the hope that someone, somewhere out there wouldn’t feel alone during recovery, like I did. If my words reached one person, I would be happy. Now, I know that my words have reached thousands of people, in every corner of the world, and have undoubtedly helped just as many. All those years ago, I had no idea I would meet so many people, share so many stories, or take part in many of the wonderful opportunities that have come my way.

A New Direction

I’m not new to blogging – nor was I ever – and I have background as a fitness blogger, which stems from my talent for writing. One could argue that I am not even new to successful blogging in terms of followers, readers, and opportunities. Technically and strategically, I knew what I was doing when I started this blog, and my passion to help make a difference in the lives of blood clot patients guided me from there. What I was new to, though, was online health blogging, and providing support for people who are going through a really, really difficult health crisis, perhaps the worst crisis of their entire lives. What I was new to was the amount of time and energy it would take to not only write about my experiences, but help other people through their experiences.

Providing Reliable Patient Support

Soon into my journey, a transition happened. I was catapulted –at lightning speed – from the role of blogger into a support and advocacy role that I never intended to be, and one that I never knew existed. Probably because I had never dealt with a significant health crisis before my DVT and PE, which almost ended my life at 29 years old in 2012. I never anticipated the time, energy and dedication that would come with this transition. I work a full-time job – in the same space, often providing patient support – and I spend hours every single day here answering questions, messages, comments and emails. I spend hours researching resources for people, compiling tools, telling my story, and sharing information. I’m not a doctor, and I’m not a healthcare professional, yet Blood Clot Recovery Network is often the first place someone turns for answers and support. I mostly can’t provide those answers – I’m not medically trained – but I can provide connection, community, encouragement, and I can lend an ear free of judgment and full of understanding.

Clinical empathy – or the skill of understanding what a person says and feels, and effectively communicating this understanding back to that person so that they too understand – is a gift that I am fortunate to have, and to share with all of you. I believe it is one of the reasons why I am so successful here. Clinical empathy – or even empathy – can also be a burden, if not properly harnessed. I am a compassionate and open-hearted person by nature. “No” or “I’m not able to do that right now” are hard phrases for me to insert into my vocabulary. I am more of a “drop everything and do it right now” person who wants to be all things, to all people, always. However, that’s not realistic, and it’s certainly not sustainable.

Being an Online Health Blogger is Not Easy

Creating consistent and reliable blog content that people can relate to, understand and appreciate is not easy. I may be a good writer, but a blog post does not come about without a lot of effort and forethought – it’s why so many bloggers simply do not stick around. Social media fatigue is real. On average, people check their phones 150 times a day. I am sure I exceed that on many days. The Internet never stops – for any of us. Online, people instantly notice if you are off your game, or are absent for any length of time. People sometimes don’t realize that there is a real person behind the screen, that struggles with the same things they do. We are all judged online for what we do and don’t do, more so I believe than we are in person. Demand for personalized attention and communication can be draining. Sharing our stories about such intimate matters as our health is both draining and demanding, and our energy reserve functions exactly like the bank where we keep our money. You can’t withdraw what you don’t have. It simply does not exist.

Sharing Success as an Online Health Blogger

As an online health blogger, I thrive on providing support and encouragement, and on sharing experiences, but I also need to make it a priority to replenish my reserves. I would not be happy, or fulfilled, if I didn’t have somebody to help through recovery – and let’s face facts – I probably could not live without the internet for any lengthy amount of time, but I have in lived through worse, so who knows. It’s a delicate balance – when helping is both your give and your get.

The truth is, you have helped to make this space what it is today by following along in the first place, and together, we are sharing success. You put the money in the bank, and now, you replenish my energy with your well wishes, positive comments, and willingness to go above and beyond to help one another. You support one another, and step in on social media, and in blog comments when I am not here. Above all else, you share your stories, just like I did all those years ago. For every note I receive about how much I have helped to make a difference in someone’s life, I also receive one about how wonderfully supportive you are.

I would not be where I am today without you and for that, I am extremely grateful. It is because of you that I continue to do what I do here, despite long hours and extensive work. You are the reason I put so much of myself into this, and you are the reason I will continue fostering healing, community and yes, even awareness about the life-altering effects of blood clots. My work here is far from over. Your work is far from over. We all have a story to tell, and we all have something to invest in the bank.

To you I say thank you. Thank you for being a part of Blood Clot Recovery Network, and for reminding me every day of why I began this work, why I do this work, and why I will continue this work.

There is hope for healing and you are not alone,

 

 


Reader Writes In: How has BCRN helped you through your recovery? How do you make a difference online?


This post is a reflection of my thoughts after attending HealtheVoices 2017, an in-person conference that brings together online advocates from a variety of health conditions for an opportunity to learn, share and connect. For daily conference happenings, search #HealtheVoices17 on social media.


Janssen paid for my travel expenses to attend the conference. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

Comments

  1. Thank you Sara!
    I am always amazed how the Universe works in the creation of taking something and totally changing it into another something amazing and purposeful. We didn’t pick this but did it pick us? I am not sure but do know it changes us in so many ways. Our commonality has made us stronger and you are a light on our mutual journey. Appreciate you.

  2. Elizabeth Zelenak says:

    My dvt and pe occurred last September and nearly took my life.ihave been part of this group and in need of support but didn’t know how to go about getting it. Now I am being evaluated for polycythemia where my bone marrow makes too many red blood cells which may have been the root cause of my problems last sept. I’m wondering if anyone on this list serve has this problem and how treatment is impacting your life now.

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