Sick After A Blood Clot? Here’s What You Need to Know.

Woman who looks like she is shivering with a cold or flu.

If you get sick with a cold or flu after a blood clot, it can feel more miserable than normal, and it can also feel like you don’t have options for symptomatic relief from coughing, fever, a runny nose, sore throat, or headache. Many medications – both over-the-counter and prescription – can interfere with blood thinners, especially warfarin, so many people may avoid taking them all together. However, if you are sick with an illness, it is often necessary to treat it, or to treat uncomfortable symptoms. Finding relief – and feeling better – are important. If you get sick after a blood clot, there are things you can do to feel better as soon as possible and get back to being healthy.

If You’re Sick After A Blood Clot, Talk to Your Doctor First

Being sick after a blood clot can be awful. Last year, I had the (respiratory) flu for the first time in my life, and it was the worst I have felt since my pulmonary embolism. At one point, I actually thought I may never recover, and that is how I knew something was going on beyond a normal cold. I had a fever, chills, body aches, coughing, a runny nose, sore throat, and a headache that scared me. My symptoms came on suddenly one afternoon, starting with a headache and a sore throat, while I was sitting at my desk. It felt like I was fine one minute and the next, I could barely make it to bed. Everything hurt.

After feeling this way for two days, I made an appointment to see my primary care physician. My husband drove me to the appointment, because I couldn’t do much of anything beyond make it to the car one step at a time. It was all too reminiscent of how I felt when I had my PE. My doctor confirmed I had the flu virus, and gave me some suggestions for managing my symptoms, which he said should subside in a few days to a week. We decided not to treat it with medication, since I was already halfway through it. He also told me if I wasn’t feeling any better in a week, or if my symptoms got worse, I needed to come back to see him. Being a respiratory virus, it is important to monitor the flu for further complications that may require hospitalization to treat, like bronchitis and pneumonia.

If you’re sick after a blood clot, don’t wait to talk to your doctor. Many illnesses can be treated – and their duration and severity shortened – with prompt medical care. I see my doctor if I have something that makes me ill for more than a few days. I also see him pretty quickly if I have anything respiratory going on. Talk to your doctor about when to see him or her in your situation.

Tips to Help You Feel Better When You’re Sick After A Blood Clot

Teapot and a steaming cup of tea.

In addition to working with your doctor, there are some things you can do at home to feel better when you are sick.

  1. Eat whole, healthy foods that feel good and nourish your body. That’s why, for most people, a steaming cup of soup broth tastes better when you are sick than when you are well (or when it is really cold outside – hello Midwest life). Remember, if you’re taking warfarin, don’t drastically change your diet. I make sure I am eating protein, yogurt, vegetables, broths, berries, and fruits (which are all part of my normal diet too).
  2. Stay well hydrated – with water. The last thing you want on top of an illness is more problems from dehydration. I also like hot tea with honey. and an electrolyte drink if I’m drinking larger than normal amounts of water, or for a little flavor. I try to avoid excessive sugar and caffeine. I steer clear of alcohol when I don’t feel well.
  3. Talk to your pharmacist (or doctor) about over-the-counter symptomatic relief. Chances are, there is a product you can take, even on blood thinners (even on warfarin). Your pharmacist will help you. They are a great, and often underutilized, resource. Mine gave me over-the-counter options for a clearing my sinuses that I didn’t even know I had. It worked, and my INR didn’t change.
  4. Breathe steamy water, use warm wash cloths or ice packs on your face, or saline rinses or sprays to relieve congestion and discomfort. I like to take a hot shower when I don’t feel well and breathe in all the heat and humidity.
  5. Look up over-the-counter drug interactions online, in addition to talking to your doctor or pharmacist. The information is out there and easy to access. You can use a resource like www.drugs.com. You should also read the product labels on any medications you are taking, and ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about the information. They are specific instructions about contraindications and potential interactions listed on all over-the-counter drugs.

You Know What They Say About Prevention

Soapy hands being washed.

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” holds true during cold and flu season too. Take preventative measures to keep yourself from getting sick in the first place, if at all possible: Wash or sanitize your hands, wipe down the shopping cart, avoid touching your face/nose/mouth, avoid places and people where you might be exposed to illnesses or germs, and wear a mask if you think you might be exposed to illness or germs, like at a doctor’s office, hospital, or on a plane. Be sure to also ask your doctor if a flu shot would benefit you.

You can cut down on seasonal allergies and sinus issues by taking your shoes off when you enter the house, showering if you have been outside and exposed to pollens or grass, and by cleaning your home’s air vents/ducts and heating and cooling systems on a regular basis. Also, don’t wear your clothes that you wore outside and in public in your bed or to sleep in.

Be Smart About Changes

If you notice any changes in your health, or if you’re not getting better in a reasonable length of time, make an appointment with your doctor. If anything changes in my respiratory status (cough, congestion, breathing), or I’m not better in a few days, I make an appointment to see my primary care doctor immediately. If you can’t get a hold of your doctor, or if you have symptoms that concern you, go to an urgent care or the hospital. An urgent care is a great place to go to get immediate medical help for common illnesses and viruses that don’t require a hospital visit. If you have signs or symptoms of a blood clot in your lung, seek emergency medical care by calling 9-1-1 or going to the closest hospital.

Some illnesses require prescribed medications to treat and in some situations, it may still be necessary to take a medication, even if there are potential interactions with your blood thinner. It doesn’t mean those interactions will occur, but it does mean you need to be aware of the potential for them to occur.

Work with your doctor to identify any issues that are cause for concern, and know what symptoms to watch out for. If you’re taking warfarin, for example, you may need to have your INR monitored more frequently while you are taking a cold or flu medication or an antibiotic – and your dosage temporarily adjusted – to ensure your INR remains in range. Taking an anticoagulant should not be a reason for not taking care of your health, and your doctor can help you work through those challenges to stay, or get, healthy again.

There is hope for healing and you are not alone,

Reader Writes In: Have you been sick with a cold or flu after a blood clot? If so, how did you handle it? Please remember: We can’t make medications or treatment recommendations here, but we can share personal stories.

Share your story in the comments below.

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