“The Patient’s Playbook” Review

patients-playbook-cover

I have been given this product as a part of a product review through the Chronic Illness Bloggers Network. Although this product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own, and I was in no way influenced by the company.

Often times throughout my recovery, I wished for a guide to get me through the situations I was facing. I went from never being sick to facing a health crisis that nearly ended my life – and I had no idea what to expect or how to deal with it. It felt like around every corner throughout my hospitalization, diagnosis and recovery, there was something I needed to be prepared for – only I had no idea what those things were, so I couldn’t be prepared. It was just one devastating blow after another. I was frightened, alone and unsure of the future. If only I could have read a book that said, “do this,” or “understand this,” and I would have felt just a little bit more in control of what was the most out-of-control situation of my life – navigating a health crisis that should have killed me.

As we know, there is no guide to understanding a blood clot diagnosis or recovery from blood clots, aside from the growing number of internet resources and support groups, often patient-led and patient-run. However, there is a guide to help you save your life during a medical crisis – or the life of someone you know – and ensure you are receiving the best medical care available.

The Patient’s Playbook by Leslie D. Michelson is that guide. It can help you change the way you manage your health – for the better. Each year, too many Americans die as a result of preventable medical error, such as mistakes, complications and even misdiagnosis. Many more people are not receiving the best care possible, simply because we don’t know to get it – or we are too afraid or overwhelmed to ask for it. The Patient’s Playbook can help you change that.

Leslie D. Michelson, the founder, chairman, and CEO of Private Health Management, and former CEO of the Prostate Cancer Foundation, is devoted to helping people achieve superior medical outcomes at every stage of their lives. His real-life stories and relatable examples in The Patient’s Playbook provide expert advice to help you choose the best doctors, select the right treatment plans, do better research online, organize and utilize your support team and ultimately prevent medical errors.

I’ll admit – I was skeptical about reading this book. I didn’t think there was anything I could possibly gain from it. After all, I had already been through and (narrowly) survived a medical crisis – it felt like a gigantic waste of time to read something that could have helped me then, not now. The truth is, I read this book very quickly and felt like a sponge while doing so – I couldn’t get enough of the information inside. Even though I have already been through the exact type of medical situation that Michelson seeks to prepare me for, this book is now an invaluable resource for me, should I ever face another medical crisis, or should my family ever have to go through something like I did. Everyone should read this book.

I could easily – and gladly – tell you about everything that I learned in this book, but that would get really long and really boring for you. Michelson uses some great examples to get his points across – many of which reminded me of my own situation – which is one of the things I loved about the book, and something you just have to experience for yourself. Instead, I am going to share the key points that struck me as invaluable. While I highly encourage you to read this book – if you don’t, or can’t – I want you to at least have some knowledge from reading my insights. These are three topics I see on a regular basis in the Blood Clot Recovery Network discussion forum, on Facebook and around the web – and they’re good ones to discuss.

Your primary care physician (PCP) is everything. And if he or she is not, do something about it – NOW.

Your PCP should be the foundation for everything in regards to your care. If he or she is not, find someone who is. You have the right to search for a PCP like an employer would search for an employee. If your PCP is not providing you with care that is helpful or knowledgeable, or care that you are comfortable with – get a new PCP. I cannot stress that enough. You have the right to look for a PCP that is a partner in your care. He or she should be an expert in you. He or she should be finding problems before they become bigger problems – and helping you get to where you need to go if the problem is out of his or her hands. I see time and time and time again, people become complacent with the care provided by their PCP, are afraid to speak up, or don’t think they can, and that is hurting you, the patient, in the long run. Please, consider your relationship with your PCP and determine if you are receiving the best care out there, with the help of The Patient’s Playbook.

You need a to see a specialist – and your PCP should help you get to one.

Now that I have made the case for a good PCP – your PCP cannot solve everything, but he or she should be able to direct you to where you need to go to continue your care with a specialist. Your PCP should have a network of specialists that he or she trusts to help you, should you face the worst situation. Rely on your PCP to get you to a specialist, but not to provide specialized care. You might have to see a specialist – like a hematologist for your blood clots and/or blood clotting disorders – discuss who to see with your PCP, and find a plan for seeking our specialized care in The Patient’s Playbook.

Second opinions are really, really okay – and so is questioning your diagnosis.

If you have questions about your diagnosis, treatment or care – ask them, ask them. Even if you have to get a second opinion, get one. That is okay….it is okay to ask for a second opinion. You are not going to hurt anyone’s feelings, but you might hurt your health by not asking. You deserve the right opinion from the right expert. The Patient’s Playbook provides lists of where to go to seek reliable information about illnesses and specialists to help you with this part.

Michelson’s work is packed with examples and resources – packed. There are even some valuable tips that I know you all discuss every day in our support communities, such as how to stay safe in the hospitals, how to stay connected with your support systems, and how to get in sooner when you need to see your doctor or specialist – it’s all in this book.

Michelson wraps up The Patient’s Playbook with two thoughts that resonated with me beyond belief (and don’t worry, I am not spoiling it for you, if you decide to read it).

The first point is when he writes –

“Anyone who’s conquered a potentially fatal illness comes back a changed person. The crisis of confidence you may go through can take years to process.”

Just let that sink in for a moment – I had to. And then I read it again, and again. Michelson “gets it,” he really does. After all, the changed person that I am, and the years of processing, is a large part of why Blood Clot Recovery Network exists. Surviving a near-fatal blood clot changed me, it changed you, and together, we’re trying to process it and heal.

And secondly, he writes –

“If you have come through a life-threatening illness, the best was to do something with your survival is simple: Use your experience to help someone else.”

It was at this point that I had to set the book down for a while and take a deep breath (good thing it was towards the end). Think about it, the best way to do something with your survival – with my survival – is to help someone else. Every single day I try to take what has happened to me, and reach out to someone else who is scared, suffering, hurting or alone, because that is how I was when I first got out of the hospital and for weeks and months after that. And each and every day, at least one other person asks me what he or she can do to help. That’s it. That’s all you, me, we have to do – we have to help someone else. The very best way to do that, that I have found, is so simple – and Michelson agrees – just reach out. Tell your story, talk about what you have been through, share what you did or learned, and let someone else know they are not alone.

 

There is hope for healing and you are not alone,

 

 


Reader Writs In: Why do want to read The Patient’s Playbook by Leslie D. Michelson?


You Survived a Blood Clot…Now What? If you’re newly diagnosed, read this.


Heading to your first follow-up appointment? Take these questions to your doctor’s appointment.

Comments

  1. I would love love LOVE a copy of this book. As someone who has been on the crazy health journey, I am loving what you have shared from reading this book. Thanks for the offer, Sara!

    • Sandy Smith says

      I would like to win this book. This is my second time with a DVT but first time pe. They think I have faster 5 as my family history is very problematic.

  2. Sara I would love so ‘MUCH’ to win a copy of this book. As you know my life has been one huge challenge since my DVT in 2012. It has also been a roller coaster when it comes to specialists in the past 4 years and although I have the support of a good family doctor, having a copy of The Playbook I feel will add to the much needed support. Thank you so much, Sara!

  3. Boy I sure wish I had read the part about a good PCP a year ago. I just finally switched and so far so good but hard to tell so far.

  4. Would like to win this book as when going through this you don’t even know anymore if you have a the right questions to ask, if you have the right pcp it’s just being lost. I had a great pcp until I had my PE and she said sorry hun. You will have to see someone else I don’t know much about what you have.

  5. Sounds like an awesome resource ! Im sure it could offer many thoughts that could be life saving. I second the comment on finding the right Dr. I have fired a PCP before that could not provide the appropriate diagnosis or direction. You have to take charge of your healthcare as no one else will for you.

  6. My doctor recommended this book to me a while back. I haven’t had the chance to read it yet though.

  7. Violet Laviolette says

    I always learn something new from you. Thank you so much! I also am a survivor of multiple “events” and gratefully have a pretty great PCP. She and I have even gotten into some great discussions which she has told me she enjoys. Most of her patients just accept and never challenge her. We jokingly say I am her PITA patient who keeps her on her toes. But just from reading this little intro I know I need to begin interviewing for an even better hemo specialist. Having expert advice on what to consider and seek would be a great help. Thanks again and blessings for health to you all.

  8. Thanks for sharing an expensive post. There are many recommendation about this book so i am gonna read this now.

  9. Charmaine Jensen says

    Sara, first I would like to make a post apologizing for now leaving this comment sooner. I have not been feeling well. I was so thrilled when I learned I was the winner of ‘The Patients Playbook’ and in fact, learned this when I received the book in the mail. It was absolutely AMAZING to say the least. It was like getting an early ‘Christmas’ gift. Thank you, Sara so very much. I have looked through part of different chapters and will be highlighting different areas and the book I can see already is amazing. I was wondering if there are any parts of this book that would be beneficial to share with our PCP?

    Charmaine

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